The Ultimate Marker Guide

Trying to find the right marker for your project can be hard. There are so many options for inks, tips, and colors. What’s the difference between an alcohol marker and a bullet marker? Which one works best on plaster? Why is this so complicated? This ultimate marker guide is here to help you understand the differences between them and decide which type is right for you.


The Ultimate Marker Guide

Chalkboard Markers

Chalkboard Markers - Marker Guide

Chalkboard markers are used to write on chalkboards like normal chalk. These markers look really good on chalkboards because they don’t have the grainy effect that normal chalk does. The cool thing about chalk markers is that you can use them on other surfaces too!

They write on windows, glass, windshields, and more. You can even use them as a dry erase marker on dry erase boards, acrylic, and glass! To erase these markers just use a damp cloth. The ink is opaque, water-based, and pigmented. Chalkboard markers come in many sizes, from jumbo to chisel tip and even extra fine point!


Alcohol Ink Markers
Alcohol Ink Markers - Marker Guide

Alcohol markers use alcohol as the solvent for the ink. These markers are known to dry fast and dry permanently. A really cool aspect of alcohol-based markers is that you can blend the colors by using alcohol! Alcohol markers come in all different types: permanent markers, calligraphy pens, and even glitter markers.


Brush Markers

Brush Markers - Marker Guide

Brush tip markers have a tip that is shaped like a small watercolor paintbrush. This tip shape allows for larger areas to be covered more quickly. A common use for these markers is hand lettering. The unique tip allows for a variety of lines that is perfect for letter art.

Another way brush markers are used is for rubber stamping. The wider tip makes it easy to cover the surface of stamps. Brush tip markers come in all different types of markers so the uses are endless. Some popular brush markers include Color In Le Plume II which are good for coloring books, the Fabric Brush Marker for fabrics, and Le Plume Permanent Markers good for almost anything.


Bullet Tip Markers

 

Similar to brush markers, bullet markers are named after the shape of their tip. Bullet markers have a tip that is cylindrical at the base and comes to a dull tip. This style of marker is good for coloring and writing. The lack of a sharp pointed tip means you can push a little harder on these markers to get a darker color than you can with other markers.

These are probably one of the most common types of typical marker tips and you've probably seen them before. We make a bullet tip marker for a lot of our lines so you can pick from Artist Pigmented Double-Ended Marker to start!


Crafting Markers

Ultimate Marker Guide

From fabric crafts to scrapbooking, there's a pen or marker that can take your project to the next level. Want to make t glow? There's a Glow in the Dark Marker that works on both paper and fabric! Want to add a little sparkle? Try the Just Glitter Premium markers. They are filled with only glitter, no pigment, so you can layer them over other colors or write with them directly. You can also try our snow marker. Snow marker ink puffs up after use giving the appearance of snow. You can use snow markers to decorate various fabrics like cotton, denim, and canvas or use it on paper!

These types of markers are perfect for everything from card making to t-shirt designs. These are perfect for crafters and artists that love to think outside the box. 

 


Paint Markers

Paint Markers - A Marker Guide

Paint markers can be used on a lot of surfaces! They can write on paper, glass, clay, terra cotta, stone, metal, and more. It’s a great way to get the effect of paint with less mess. Paint markers can be split into two categories: acrylic and oil-based.

These types of markers are perfect for labeling, urban art, and working on uncommon surfaces.

 


Fabric Markers

Fabric Markers - Ultimate Marker Guide

Fabric markers are used to create art on fabric - just like the name implies! After drawing or decorating simply heat set with an iron and that will keep your work from washing away over time.

If fabric projects and fabric art is your thing, there are so many options for markers to choose from. Tip sizes can vary from fine fabric markers to broad tips and even brush tips markers. You can even find glitter markers and glow in the dark markers to use for your next project!

 

So there you have it, a comprehensive guide to picking the perfect marker. Of course, there are lots of options out there so this list could go on forever, but this list will give you the best place to start for your artistic needs!

 


Created By: Marvy Uchida Team

Our talented in-house creative team
Next article Markers 101: Different Types of Marker Tips

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